Something Old, Something New

Copenhagen Fashion Week SS20 Wrap Up

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If Henrik Vibskov isn’t a name that you’ve heard before, I would encourage you to research not only his designs but delve deep into everything that he has contributed to the Arts over the last couple of decades. This fashion collection is maybe his 30th, it’s inspiration is centered around wind and the many complexities of that particular element. With that theme at the helm of the collection it’s translated through light and breezy silhouettes and billowing aerodynamic spaces which are a vast contrast from the heavy knits and use of layering that’s displayed in previous collections.

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By Marlene Birger

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Known for their beautiful classics and timeless silhouettes, By Marlene Birger, always seems to deliver exactly what’s missing from your wardrobe. Although I am a minimalist at heart, I love a statement piece or dash of fun prints here and there. This collection is so very cool and relaxed. It’s a favorite so far this season. I also love the idea of luxe and casual dressing. Before now, I never thought to pair a basket weaved baseball hat with a sequin dress or anything for that matter, but now I am experiencing an extreme case of fomo.

Cecilie Bahnsen

Cecilie Bahnsen’s entire brand is one big Spring/Summer collection rolled up into one…at least in my opinion. Actually that’s not a bad thing. The old saying is “if something isn’t broke, don’t fix it”. And besides, It’s good to have brand identity, right? Cecilie produces some of the most beautiful and dream-like dresses imaginable, each with amazing details which are nothing short of couture. I also appreciated the new elements introduced in this collection. Who doesn’t love tailored suiting, feathers, and volumious silk organza; oh yes, and we got sprinkles of yellow and pink on the runway as well this season. I would say this collections was a 10/10. It checked all of my boxes for sure.


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We all know the Ganni girl, she’s internationally recognized now thanks to the creative directors of this beloved Danish brand. This collection fully encapsulates the Ganni girl, and she is just as cool as she’s always been, but now a bit more refined…grown up. We see loads of texture and print mixing, splashes of pastels, major inspo from the 70s, as well as nods to the super cool and relaxed 90s. I would go as far as calling the collections dreamy and super girly with a bit of edge. And of course we love the sustainability elements of the collections. Designers re-visted their archives and pulled pieces to re-work, as a way of making the old, new again. I also read that the brand implemented physical and digital pop-up kiosks during fashion week in an effect to make the collections readily accessible to customers for purchase.


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If you could imagine an intersection of sophistication and playfulness, then Baum und Pferdgarten is the place. Honestly, I have never seen such a juxtaposition of ideas that were so cohesive at the same time. After scouring photos of the collection I felt a sense of delight, optimism even. To see tulle tops and dresses layered over tailored suiting and clean lines, topped off with a pastel tulle buckle hat is quite a lot to digest; however, it couldn’t be more satisfying. I loved every piece shown in this collection. It was actually quite difficult to select my favorites for my collage. Kudos to the designers for evoking such excitement for their customers with truly unique pieces and styling. The collection is perfectly simply, yet very complex all at the same time. Maybe I should consider sporting a pair of printed biker shorts with dad sneakers, and a beautifully structured tailored suit vest.

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Rodebjer is yet another designer that I hadn’t had the privilege of ever viewing a collection from. However, I was absolutely impressed by the level of craftmanship that went into each design. Initially, I am drawn to the neutral color palette, then there’s the layering of separates. There is also a great sense of comfortability present in each look. How the dresses seem to lay effortlessly on the body, and the flowiness of the trousers and blouses are so very flattering on all body types. The collection is for the woman looking to tap into her feminine energy.


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Inspired by Mexican-American singer, Selena Quintanilla-Pérez, this Saks Potts collection is titled “Latina Gala.” Ruffled crop tops, bedazzled bralettes and colorful cowboy boots were sheer giveaways. Seeing photos of the details on the accessories that models donned as they paraded down the runway caused me to really reminisce of the 90s. Aesthetically every look was lighthearted and playful, evoking great nostalgia. Although I can’t say that this brand has stood out to me in the past; looks from this season’s show were all over Instagram. The right people were in attendance at this show, creating mega buzz for this collection.


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Stine Goya does a wonderful job of story-telling. Each one of kind design is jam-packed with visual simulation and underlying interpretation. This season the runway looks were amazing; however, the important work happened beyond the clothing on the runway. Goya didn’t call up an agency and cast typical models that usually take the runways during fashion week. She brought her inspiration of LGBTQ ballroom culture from the 80s to life by demanding inclusivity on the runway. Both men and women, in all shapes, sizes and races sashayed down the runway donning large graphic polka dots, bows, ruffles and bright floral prints.

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Copenhagen kicked off fashion month with a bang. I thoroughly enjoyed the shows so far. I can’t wait to see what the other fashion capitals have in store for us. Be sure to stay on the look out for my fashion week recaps right here on Something Old, Something New

Swedish Fashion Council Cancels Fashion Week in Stockholm

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Could Sweden’s fashion council be forecasting what’s to come in other major fashion capitals by cancelling Stockholm’s SS20 fashion week?

As we embark upon fashion month and all of it’s excitement, we must recognize that one of the renowned fashion city’s will not be participating this season. Although I have yet to visit Stockholm, it’s on my buckle list of places to live and work, and especially experience the energy that comes with rushing from show to show during fashion week.

Last month after the Swedish Fashion Council initially released a statement that Stockholm’s Fashion Week event would be stepping away from it’s traditional format, organizers later announced that they had decided to forego the event indefinitely.

Reasons given for the cancellations focus on working to create more sustainability and to develop alternative practices; as well as provide better opportunities and support for the local fashion talent. Personally I think this idea is wonderful, and it’s a great way to stand up for what you believe and actually practice what your preach. Sadly, sustainability has become on of those buzzwords that so many “conscious” people use nowadays. Although we don’t quite know exactly what the Swedish Fashion Council will do in place of hosting large expensive stage shows for designers, I do believe that they are making strides in the right direction. Jennie Rosen, CEO of the Swedish Fashion Council said, “By doing this we can adapt to new demands, reach sustainability goals and be able to set new standards for fashion.” She also goes on to say that with Sweden’s extensively growing fashion industry that it’s crucial to support designers and brands of the next generation.

Does fashion week do more harm than good?

…especially for smaller brands. Yes there are runway presentations, and loads of people (buyers, editors, influencers, etc.) there to witness the shows but if you are a very small brand who can’t afford to produce those extravagant items, then what’s the point? I think that’s what the Swedish Fashion Council is looking to change. Many larger brands and designers have already started to merge their runways show into see now, buy now strategy offering consumers instant access to purchase pieces.

Although the Swedish Fashion Council hasn’t revealed its new strategy for Fashion Week in Stockholm just yet, they have created a few initiatives such as: Fashion Talent incubator for emerging designers that focuses on promoting overall brand sustainability aiding with business, trademarking and consultancy; and the Swedish Fashion Ethical Charter which is a new policy that forces accountability among fashion industry leaders to ensure shared values and guidelines on body ideals, diversity and issues of social responsibility.

Overall I am very excited to see what’s to come from this fashion week revamp. Yes I’m sure many fashion aficinados are disappointed that there will not be SS20 runway shows this season; however, designers are still having presentations through showroom appointments and their social media accounts to engage and interact with fans. Also we can all look to the other Scandinavian capitals, Oslo and Copenhagen, for our fashion fix.

Paris Fashion Week - Loewe SS19

After flipping through about 50 still photos and watching the pieces in motion coming down the runway, the only thing I could really think was how much I loved all of the textures. From sophisticated satin and brightly colored feathers to raffia cross-body bags; this collection spoke to every part of me. Could I possibly be a Loewe woman now?

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Loewe has never been on my radar, as I’ve always viewed it as a brand known for it’s luxury accessories and leather good. However, with this collection there were notes of a nomadic, carefree woman that I found rather relatable. The color palette was easily disgestible, and to my liking. The silhouettes ranged from fringed and flowly to more structured blazers which reinforced the brands elegance.

Could this be the start of a budding aspirational relationship between myself and Loewe